Nice! Visuino – Sensor of temperature using LM35 and display LCD 1 by Fredy Alvarez with @arduino

This is a brief introduction to the environment of development and visual programming for the platform Arduino, Visuino is a property of Mitov software and I alone take part making tests and some libraries not yet concluded.

The example is to realize an analogical lecture in my Arduino Uno of a sensor of temperature LM35 and this analogical information to open it in a display of lcd 16×2 classic with controller HD44780, the whole programming does in Visuino and the code example appears in the IDE of Arduino.

Schematic diagram of the circuit

For more information about Visuino please visit the official web page:

http://www.visuino.com/

Also it can join the group of google

https://plus.google.com/u/0/communities/116125623808250792822

Or in Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/groups/861801593868581/

https://www.facebook.com/groups/arduino.uacj.iit.isdc/

 

Source: Nice! Visuino – Sensor of temperature using LM35 and display LCD 1 by Fredy Alvarez with @arduino

Programming Hex-code on an Attiny85 with the Arduino

To get a HEX-code in your Attiny85 it is possible to use the Arduino as a programmer, but as you cannot load hexcode  in your IDE, it involves using avrdude.

First of all, we need to get the Attiny85 clocked to 8Mhz.

Open up your Arduino software and upload the Arduino ISP sketch to your board.

Disconnect the board from  your computer and attach the Attiny as shown  here. Also make sure you download and install the Attiny core files as described in that article

Connect your Arduino board in again and choose these settings.

Tools – Board – Attiny85 @ 8Mhz (internal oscillator; BOD disabled)
Tools – Programmer – Arduino as ISP
Tools – Serial Port – COMx (x being the com port that your arduino is connected to)

Then select

Tools – Burn Bootloader.

Just to clarify, you are not burning a bootloader here. You are resetting the fuses in the Attiny to clock it at 8Mhz.

Next, get the firmware into the chip. With that I mean the hex file you want in your chip

We do that by using the arduino as a programmer.  You should still still have the ArduinoISP sketch loaded on your Arduino.

Make sure your Attiny is still attached to your Arduino as described here and open a command prompt.  (In your windows start menu type cmd or chose the terminal in Linux/Ubuntu).

Type:

avrdude

This will bring up a list of options explaining what everything does.
Screenshot from 2013-12-11 14:09:55

Only need a few of those commands.

This is what to type in cmd (on 1 line)

avrdude -c avrisp -p t85 -P comX -b 9600 –U flash:w:example_attiny85.hex:i

What does all that mean?

Avrdude… This calls the program-c avrisp…  This tells avrdude which programmer you are using.  The Arduino shows up as avrisp

-p t85… This is the avrdude code for Attiny85.

-P comX… This is the com port your programmer is attached to.  (Change the X to suit your programmer.)

-b 9600… This is the baud rate (Use what is specified in the sketch loaded onto your Arduino.) .

-U flash:w:example_attiny85.hex:i   This tells avrdude you want to write (w) the firmware (example_attiny85.hex) to flash memory (flash).  The ‘i’ is at the end to tell avrdude what format it is writing in.

Avrdude should now read your chip, write to your chip, then read your chip.

If all goes well, you should get:    avrdude done.

 

Source: Programming Hex-code on an Attiny85 with the Arduino

MicroLink GSM – tiny, Arduino compatible, rapid prototyping

MicroLink_1I just backed up this project on KickStarter 

 

What is MicroLink GSM?

Tiny self-contained board that can do automation, alerts, cellular data, phone calls, SMS text messages, and more – USB plug & play.

MicroLink_2

MicroLink_4

Technical information

  • Atmel Atmega328P microcontroller – same as Arduino UNO
  • Latest generation SIM800H module (850/900/1800/1900 MHz)
  • Genuine FTDI USB chip
  • Interrupt pins available
  • An LED is connected to pin D13, same as the Arduino UNO
  • Gold plated IPEX u.Fl antenna connector
  • Quad-band multi-region antenna included
  • Accepts standard sized SIM card
  • 6 uA sleep current (Extra Flash: 11 uA)
  • Approx. 10 mA typical processing current
  • Approx. 400 mA net peak momentary current during GSM events
  • Can be powered and programmed by USB Micro USB
  • UART (Serial), SPI, and I2C peripherals
  • Atmega328P talks with SIM800H using AT commands (easy, reliable)
  • 0.1 inch pitch pins – can fit on a standard breadboard.

MicroLink_3

Connect absolutely anything to the Internet with Spark

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Everything is getting high-tech — from phones to jewelry. It will not be surprising if, soon enough, we will see high-tech clothes. With the Internet opening tremendous opportunities, people are not shying away from utilizing them to create innovative and unprecedented things. In fact, a whole new category called “Internet of Things” has emerged, where objects are provided with unique identifiers that help them transfer data over a network without the need of a computer.

In an attempt to bring Internet of Things closer to people, a tiny board called Spark Core has come into the market.

The Spark Core with Chip Antenna is a very small WiFi development board that makes it very easy for everyone to create hardware that is connected to the Internet. In fact, the tiny chip is all you will need. Just power it up with the help of a USB connection or a battery, and you will be able to control LEDs, motors, and switches in addition to being able to collect data from its various sensors over the internet.

hy15tech-lead--_HY_2154537g

This core has an on-board controller that is actually a small, low-cost, and low-power computer that has the capability of running a single application. This micro-controller is the one that runs the show. In fact, it runs your software and tells the rest of the core what to do. This tiny little thing does not have an operating system like your computer and just runs a single application (that is also known as firmware or an embedded application). This application can very simple — made up of only a few lines of code — or extremely complex, depending on what you want to do with it.

The first and foremost goal of Spark’s creation is its ease of use. In fact, you can start off without any experience in using hardware or software.

If you are familiar with Arduino, you will love this chip. The core uses the same wiring and programming language as Arduino. It also has an accessory called Shield that helps you connect it to any standard Arduino shield.

The hardware design files — board design, schematic, and bill of materials — are open source as is the firmware. This makes it very user-friendly.

For more information check out their website.

https://www.spark.io/

An I²C Bus powered Arduino IO Expander Board controlled via Bluetooth and Android | Open Electronics

During my research for Home Automation Project, I came across this excellent article. It helped to clarify few things related to the mobile app controls.

 

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Today we’ll expand Arduino’s digital resources thanks to an I2C bus equipped shield and we’ll allow the management of the board via a Bluetooth connection RN-42 through an Android systems.

All Arduino boards feature a number of digital I/Os. For the simplest projects, such resources are usually more than sufficient, but in those where they you need several control lines, “standard” I/Os can be less than enough, because some pins are shared with internal resources while others are dedicated to external shields.

Please click the link below for full article at Open Electronics.

An I²C Bus powered Arduino IO Expander Board controlled via Bluetooth and Android | Open Electronics.