8 Ways Technology Is Improving Your Health

I came across this excellent article by KAREN REED at Positive Health Wellness and have summarize it as below, to read the full article please click the link given at the end of the summary.

 

We hear all the time about how technology is bad for us. Since the introduction of computers, we spend more time sitting at a desk than moving around at work. We have created this sedentary lifestyle that is causing havoc in our overall life.

What if I were to tell you that technology has produced benefits? Would you believe me if I said that technology is good for your health?

Most of you wouldn’t look at first. Well, you may be able to think of a couple of ways that the computer has helped, but you are still stuck on all the negatives that ‘experts’ have shared in the past. The problem with the ‘experts’ is that they are only focused on the negatives. They haven’t looked at so many of the benefits.

So, that’s what we’ll do today. We’ll consider all the ways that technology improves our health. We’ll discuss just how it has boosted results in certain areas of healthcare and what it does for us daily.

  • Technology Is Everywhere in Medicine
  • It Pushes Us to Do More Activity
  • Better Ability for Communication Between Doctors and Patients
  • More Ability to Do Research into Problems
  • There Are Devices That Keep the Body Working as It Should
  • Better Treatment Options for Various Ailments and Diseases
  • Improved Prediction of Diagnosis and Life Expectancy
  • Faster and More Accurate Diagnosis of Conditions
  • Technology Improves Recording of Information in Real Time
  • There Are Two Sides to Technology

Conclusion:

Don’t just write technology off. This is something that really can improve our lives and our health. It just must be used in the right way.

 

To continue reading the full article, please click the link given below.

8 Ways Technology Is Improving Your Health

Claim your free 15GB of OneDrive storage

Microsoft has grudgingly agreed to let current OneDrive users keep their 15GB of free cloud storage and 15GB of free Camera Roll “bonus” storage, rather than dropping you to 5GB as previously stated, but only if you’re aware of the offer and don’t mind a bit of spam.

To take advantage of the offer, visit this Microsoft page. Microsoft representatives said the company does not have a supplementary explanatory blog post or statement to add at the present, but they did supply the webpage address, whose URL lists it as a “preview” at the moment.

You’ve already navigated the first hurdle: since users have to manually opt in to the offer, OneDrive users who are unaware of the deal won’t be able to take advantage of it. And there’s a small catch: by selecting the offer, you agree “to receive promotional emails from OneDrive,” although Microsoft immediately says that you can unsubscribe as well—how to do that, however, isn’t exactly clear.

It appears that un-checking the “promotional email” box, then clicking the “Keep your free storage” button also appears to work. In response to a question from PCWorld, a Microsoft representative said that the wording is being changed to “make it more clear”.

To read the full article please click the link below.

http://www.pcworld.com/article/3014183/data-center-cloud/microsoft-will-let-you-keep-your-free-15gb-of-onedrive-storage-if-you-claim-it.html

Is Extortionware the Next Big Threat?

By Stu Sjouwerman, for KnowBe4.com Security Awareness Training

TK Keanini, CTO, Lancope wrote a 2015 Predictions editorial over at SC Magazine. He said he expects more malware like CryptoLocker and CryptoWall over the next 12 months, but also something new called “extortionware”.

I wholeheartedly agree what he said: “Ransomware remains profitable, and cybercriminals are always looking for areas to grow their business. To date, victims have mainly been individuals with data from their computers or smartphones being held for ransom. But the one industry at great risk here is health care. Three factors make it a highly attractive target for ransomware expansion in 2015 – the mandate to move to electronic records, the sensitive nature of health care data, and the immaturity of the information security practices that exist in the health care industry today. This is a scary notion because we rely so heavily on the availability and accuracy of patient records. The cost of a compromise could range from an inconvenience to loss of life.”

But then he predicts something else for 2015 and that I do not agree with so much: “Extortionware is an expansion on ransomware whereby unless you pay a certain amount to the attacker, the data will be made public for all to see (or for more targeted disclosure). What if the data contains evidence of infidelity, for example? The list of possible incriminating data goes on and on, but you can see how this differs from ransomware. Much like spear phishing, this attack will be much more targeted, but attackers will yield a higher take per victim, and those victims are less likely to involve law enforcement due to the sensitive nature of the data.

Is this very likely? Article continued here.

MQTT not IoT “god protocol,” but getting closer

Interesting article by Don Dingee (@L2myowndevices)

One protocol, and its descendants, drove the success of the World Wide Web. IP, or Internet Protocol, is the basis of every browser connection and the backbone of IT data centers. Some assumed that the Internet of Things would follow suit, with the thought that having an IP address would be a sufficient condition to connect.

The problem on the IoT isn’t IP – the problem is all the stuff layered on top of it. Running protocols such as HTTP, SSL, and XML requires significant compute power and memory space. The average PC, smartphone, or tablet has enough horsepower today to do that, but the average sensor running on a smaller microcontroller does not. (ARM Cortex-M7 notwithstanding.)

To read the full article, click the link below.

MQTT not IoT “god protocol,” but getting closer.