Netiquettes for Using Web/ Texting Jargon

Knowing when to use jargon in your messaging is about knowing who your audience is, knowing if the context is informal or professional, and then using good judgment. If you know the people well, and it is a personal and informal communication, then absolutely use abbreviation jargon. On the flip side, if you are just starting a friendship or professional relationship with the other person, then it is a good idea to avoid abbreviations until you have developed a relationship rapport.

If the messaging is in a professional context with someone at work, or with a customer or vendor outside your company, then avoid abbreviations altogether. Using full word spellings shows professionalism and courtesy. It is much easier to err on the side of being too professional and then relax your communications over time than doing the inverse.

Capitalize and Punctuate Web/ Texting Abbreviations

Capitalization is a non-concern when using text message abbreviations and chat jargon. You are welcome to use all uppercase (e.g. ROFL) or all lowercase (e.g. rofl), and the meaning is identical. Avoid typing entire sentences in uppercase, though, as that means shouting in online speak.

Proper punctuation is similarly a non-concern with most text message abbreviations. For example, the abbreviation for ‘Too Long, Didn’t Read’ can be abbreviated as TL;DR or as TLDR. Both are an acceptable format, with or without punctuation.

Never use periods (dots) between your jargon letters. It would defeat the purpose of speeding up thumb typing. For example, ROFL would never be spelled R.O.F.L., and TTYL would never be spelled T.T.Y.L.

Nice! Visuino – Sensor of temperature using LM35 and display LCD 1 by Fredy Alvarez with @arduino

This is a brief introduction to the environment of development and visual programming for the platform Arduino, Visuino is a property of Mitov software and I alone take part making tests and some libraries not yet concluded.

The example is to realize an analogical lecture in my Arduino Uno of a sensor of temperature LM35 and this analogical information to open it in a display of lcd 16×2 classic with controller HD44780, the whole programming does in Visuino and the code example appears in the IDE of Arduino.

Schematic diagram of the circuit

For more information about Visuino please visit the official web page:

http://www.visuino.com/

Also it can join the group of google

https://plus.google.com/u/0/communities/116125623808250792822

Or in Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/groups/861801593868581/

https://www.facebook.com/groups/arduino.uacj.iit.isdc/

 

Source: Nice! Visuino – Sensor of temperature using LM35 and display LCD 1 by Fredy Alvarez with @arduino

MicroLink GSM – tiny, Arduino compatible, rapid prototyping

MicroLink_1I just backed up this project on KickStarter 

 

What is MicroLink GSM?

Tiny self-contained board that can do automation, alerts, cellular data, phone calls, SMS text messages, and more – USB plug & play.

MicroLink_2

MicroLink_4

Technical information

  • Atmel Atmega328P microcontroller – same as Arduino UNO
  • Latest generation SIM800H module (850/900/1800/1900 MHz)
  • Genuine FTDI USB chip
  • Interrupt pins available
  • An LED is connected to pin D13, same as the Arduino UNO
  • Gold plated IPEX u.Fl antenna connector
  • Quad-band multi-region antenna included
  • Accepts standard sized SIM card
  • 6 uA sleep current (Extra Flash: 11 uA)
  • Approx. 10 mA typical processing current
  • Approx. 400 mA net peak momentary current during GSM events
  • Can be powered and programmed by USB Micro USB
  • UART (Serial), SPI, and I2C peripherals
  • Atmega328P talks with SIM800H using AT commands (easy, reliable)
  • 0.1 inch pitch pins – can fit on a standard breadboard.

MicroLink_3

How to avoid installing bundleware with the help of Unchecky

Installing third-party programs isn’t the minefield it was during the good old days of Windows XP. But every now and then, some desktop apps still try to sneak annoying tool-bars and other software past you during installation.

Known as bundle-ware, the options to not install these additional programs can be easy to miss if you’re not paying attention. That’s where a utility called Unchecky can come in handy, by watching over third-party installations so that you don’t have to. It should work with most software and is well worth using when it does.

Checking in with Unchecky

Visit the Unchecky website and click the big, orange Download button on the front page. Install the program as you normally would—it should be a quick process.

 

Watch Unchecky in action

Do Not Install XP Patches For Embedded XP

By now, you probably know about the registry hack trick to get updates for Windows XP. I shouldn’t have to tell you this, but that’s a really bad idea, one you should not do, and both Microsoft and at least one security firm are saying not to do it.

Initially, I thought they were enabling XP to use Windows 7 updates, which wouldn’t be that far-fetched. XP and 7 have considerable overlap and common code. But I learned these are not Windows 7 patches, they are in fact for Windows Point of Sales (Windows Embedded) machines, which run a custom version of the regular XP.
Redmond is warning everyone to not use a workaround that claims to solve the Windows XP security updates problem. The hack is making a small registry change that will let XP receive security updates, and tricks Windows Update into thinking that the XP version is an embedded point-of-sale OS that Redmond supports through 2019.
Here is the Official Response from Microsoft.

“We recently became aware of a hack that purportedly aims to provide security updates to Windows XP customers,” Microsoft tells Tom’s Hardware. “The security updates that could be installed are intended for Windows Embedded and Windows Server 2003 customers and do not fully protect Windows XP customers.”

“Windows XP customers also run a significant risk of functionality issues with their machines if they install these updates, as they are not tested against Windows XP,” the company adds. “The best way for Windows XP customers to protect their systems is to upgrade to a more modern operating system, like Windows 7 or Windows 8.1.”

 The normal XP and embedded XP are are similar but not identical. The updates would only partially protect XP simply could break things, the Microsoft experts claim.