Curb your caffeine addiction at work

How about a new year resolution to curb your Caffeine addiction at work.
Here are five ways to stay on top of everything at work without overloading yourself with caffeine.
1. Drink lots of water
Keep a bottle of water with you and sip it throughout the day. Dehydration can leave you feeling sluggish and sleepy.

2. Have a good breakfast
Breakfast is the most important meal of the day! Avoid greasy, sugary and carb-filled food. Opt for fruits, wholegrain bread and yogurt.

3. Take a walk 
This can boost energy levels and decrease fatigue. Making this a daily habit can also add seven years to your life. To stay wellwalk for 30 to 45 minutes nearly every day. Do it all at once or in chunks as short as five to 10 minutes. Aim for a brisk pace of three to four miles an hour, but remember that you’ll get plenty of benefit from strolling at a slower pace as long as you stick with it.

4. Listen to music 
This can increase your concentration levels, keep you awake or even give your mood a boost. Studies  have shown that 9 out 10 people worked better when they were listening to music!

 5. Power nap
Search for a quiet place at work to lay down. Consider stashing a pillow and blanket in your drawer if you plan to nap in your office to help relax you. Keep naps short. Aim to nap for only 10 to 20 minutes. The longer you nap, the more likely you are to feel groggy afterward.

Run Hyper-V and VirtualBox on Windows 10

I have been using VirtualBox for long time and have setup quite a few VMs for development and testing purposes. I upgraded to the Windows 10 Pro for my main work laptop, and began working with Hyper-V, which is available on a client OS since Windows 8.  Since I use virtualization to do software testing as well development work on daily basis, I was eager to see what Hyper-V could do. Hyper-V have impressed me so far.  It performs well and stays out of my way when I’m not using it.

However, as I have a lot of my previous work in VirtualBox, and rather than try to make all the old VMs work with Hyper-V, it made more sense to continue using them on the original platform (VirtualBox).  The challenge is that VirtualBox and Hyper-V cannot run at the same time.  Only one hypervisor can run at a time, and since Hyper-V runs all the time, VirtualBox always fails as it only runs when launched.

The workaround (there’s always a workaround, isn’t there?) is to disable Hyper-V when you want to run VirtualBox.  I found a few different ways on the web to accomplish this, including altering the registry, and running a command.  But the only one I found that worked involved changing the boot configuration using bcdedit. 

If you run bcdedit with no arguments, you should see a property called hypervisorlaunchtype.  This will be either set to off or auto.

To disable Hyper-V in order to use VirtualBox, open a command prompt as administrator and run the command:

bcdedit /set hypervisorlaunchtype off

You’ll need to reboot, but then you’ll be all set to run VirtualBox. To turn Hyper-V back on, run:

bcdedit /set hypervisorlaunchtype auto

and then reboot.

Netiquettes for Using Web/ Texting Jargon

Knowing when to use jargon in your messaging is about knowing who your audience is, knowing if the context is informal or professional, and then using good judgment. If you know the people well, and it is a personal and informal communication, then absolutely use abbreviation jargon. On the flip side, if you are just starting a friendship or professional relationship with the other person, then it is a good idea to avoid abbreviations until you have developed a relationship rapport.

If the messaging is in a professional context with someone at work, or with a customer or vendor outside your company, then avoid abbreviations altogether. Using full word spellings shows professionalism and courtesy. It is much easier to err on the side of being too professional and then relax your communications over time than doing the inverse.

Capitalize and Punctuate Web/ Texting Abbreviations

Capitalization is a non-concern when using text message abbreviations and chat jargon. You are welcome to use all uppercase (e.g. ROFL) or all lowercase (e.g. rofl), and the meaning is identical. Avoid typing entire sentences in uppercase, though, as that means shouting in online speak.

Proper punctuation is similarly a non-concern with most text message abbreviations. For example, the abbreviation for ‘Too Long, Didn’t Read’ can be abbreviated as TL;DR or as TLDR. Both are an acceptable format, with or without punctuation.

Never use periods (dots) between your jargon letters. It would defeat the purpose of speeding up thumb typing. For example, ROFL would never be spelled R.O.F.L., and TTYL would never be spelled T.T.Y.L.

GitHub Flow

what is GitHub Flow?

  • Anything in the master branch is deployable
  • To work on something new, create a descriptively named branch off of master (ie: new-oauth2-scopes)
  • Commit to that branch locally and regularly push your work to the same named branch on the server
  • When you need feedback or help, or you think the branch is ready for merging, open a pull request
  • After someone else has reviewed and signed off on the feature, you can merge it into master
  • Once it is merged and pushed to ‘master’, you can and should deploy immediately

That is the entire flow. It is very simple, very effective and works for fairly large teams.

So, let’s look at each of these steps in turn.

#1 – anything in the master branch is deploy-able

#2 – create descriptive branches off of master

#3 – push to named branches constantly

#4 – open a pull request at any time

#5 – merge only after pull request review

#6 – deploy immediately after review

To read the full article by Scot Chacon please click here.

8 Ways Technology Is Improving Your Health

I came across this excellent article by KAREN REED at Positive Health Wellness and have summarize it as below, to read the full article please click the link given at the end of the summary.

 

We hear all the time about how technology is bad for us. Since the introduction of computers, we spend more time sitting at a desk than moving around at work. We have created this sedentary lifestyle that is causing havoc in our overall life.

What if I were to tell you that technology has produced benefits? Would you believe me if I said that technology is good for your health?

Most of you wouldn’t look at first. Well, you may be able to think of a couple of ways that the computer has helped, but you are still stuck on all the negatives that ‘experts’ have shared in the past. The problem with the ‘experts’ is that they are only focused on the negatives. They haven’t looked at so many of the benefits.

So, that’s what we’ll do today. We’ll consider all the ways that technology improves our health. We’ll discuss just how it has boosted results in certain areas of healthcare and what it does for us daily.

  • Technology Is Everywhere in Medicine
  • It Pushes Us to Do More Activity
  • Better Ability for Communication Between Doctors and Patients
  • More Ability to Do Research into Problems
  • There Are Devices That Keep the Body Working as It Should
  • Better Treatment Options for Various Ailments and Diseases
  • Improved Prediction of Diagnosis and Life Expectancy
  • Faster and More Accurate Diagnosis of Conditions
  • Technology Improves Recording of Information in Real Time
  • There Are Two Sides to Technology

Conclusion:

Don’t just write technology off. This is something that really can improve our lives and our health. It just must be used in the right way.

 

To continue reading the full article, please click the link given below.

8 Ways Technology Is Improving Your Health